Software Freedom Conservancy

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Displaying posts by Denver Gingerich

Helping each other: the right to repair win and software freedom

by Denver Gingerich on November 6, 2020

We were very excited to hear that Massachusetts voters approved a new right to repair law earlier this week. Laws like these are important tools in allowing us to control the devices that we use. In particular, we believe it is important that people be able to fix their own devices, and to be provided with all the information they might need to make the best repair decisions. This principle has applied to cars for over a century and, now that cars are increasingly made up of computers, the implications for both repairing vehicles and software freedom are hard to ignore.

The proposed law is an excellent start for providing telematics information to vehicle owners. As the full text of the law (pages 5 and 6) describes, there are still implementation aspects to be decided by the Massachusetts Attorney General. These include a notice that describes "the mechanical data collected, stored and transmitted by a telematics system" and "the prospective owner's ability to access the vehicle's mechanical data through a mobile device", which dealers will be required to provide to prospective vehicle buyers and lessees.

The law also states the vehicle manufacturers must implement "an inter-operable, standardized and open access platform across all of the manufacturer's makes and models [that] shall be capable of securely communicating all mechanical data emanating directly from the motor vehicle via direct data connection to the platform". While the law mentions that this data needs to at least "be directly accessible by the owner of the vehicle through a mobile-based application", we would like to see the Massachusetts Attorney General clarify in their notice that the data should be accessible through an API available to the owner as part of this, one that is "inter-operable" and "standardized" per above.

We find often that people can read "a mobile-based application" to mean apps that are available via the Google Play Store or Apple App Store, but nowhere else. Both of these stores are proprietary software and lock users into single-company controlled infrastructure, so it is important to have other options for those who don't want to use such apps, including using an app available in some other store, for some other operating system, or that they wrote themselves if they like (using the API described earlier).

Initiatives like this Massachusetts Right to Repair measure are important for our freedom - our freedom to repair our devices (which includes vehicles) ourselves or by the repair shop of our choice, and our freedom to use whichever tools we wish in order to complete the repair. The right to repair movement is crucial in this world of increasingly locked-down devices, and we hope to build even more bridges to support the shared principles with software freedom going forward. We applaud and stand with the voters who made this initiative happen and look forward to many more such initiatives in the future.


Here is the email we sent to the Massachusetts Attorney General earlier today:

Dear Ms. Healey:

We at Software Freedom Conservancy, a 501(c)(3) charity dedicated in part to helping people take control of their computing experience through the freedom to choose which software they use, are very supportive of the "Right to Repair Law" Vehicle Data Access Requirement Initiative that Massachusetts voters approved this past week (organizationally and also as it relates to employees of ours based in Massachusetts). We see that as Attorney General you have been tasked with writing the telematics notice that manufacturers will provide to vehicle buyers and lessees, and we'd like to provide some suggestions given our experience with the different apps and software that users may wish to use to receive this telematics data.

In particular, we see that the notice will describe "the mechanical data collected, stored and transmitted by a telematics system" and "the prospective owner's ability to access the vehicle's mechanical data through a mobile device", which dealers will be required to provide to prospective vehicle buyers and lessees. The law also states the vehicle manufacturers must implement "an inter-operable, standardized and open access platform across all of the manufacturer's makes and models [that] shall be capable of securely communicating all mechanical data emanating directly from the motor vehicle via direct data connection to the platform".

While the law mentions that this data needs to at least "be directly accessible by the owner of the vehicle through a mobile-based application", we would like to see the Attorney General clarify in their notice that the data should be accessible through an API available to the owner as part of this, one that is "inter-operable" and "standardized" per above.

We find often that people can read "a mobile-based application" to mean apps that are available via the Google Play Store or Apple App Store, but nowhere else. Both of these stores are proprietary software and lock users into single-company controlled infrastructure, so it is important to have other options for those who don't want to use such apps, including using an app available in some other store, for some other operating system, or that they wrote themselves if they like (using the API described earlier).

Please let us know if you have any questions about our suggestions above. For reference, Conservancy's Execute Director, Karen Sandler, has been CCed. We are available to help draft specific text or join whatever process you establish for comments related to the implementation of this measure.

Thanks for your consideration!

Tags: law, software freedom for everyone

Asking Microsoft to resign from the RIAA over youtube-dl takedown demand

by Denver Gingerich on October 26, 2020

We learned on Friday that GitHub removed youtube-dl's primary collaboration forum and code repository from their site, which had been hosted at https://github.com/ytdl-org/youtube-dl. The action was in response to a DMCA Section 512 notice that the RIAA sent demanding removal of youtube-dl, which was released and distributed via GitHub under a liberal FOSS license. In the notice, the RIAA cites DMCA Section 1201 (the removing digital restrictions section) as justification for youtube-dl's removal.

We believe that youtube-dl has substantial non-infringing uses. There are many, but to name a few, youtube-dl has the following important features:

  • enable users to watch YouTube videos without installing any non-free software
  • watch YouTube at different speeds (including speeds YouTube does not offer) — an important feature for accessibility!
  • change the YouTube video quality setting manually when the user is more aware of bandwidth issues than YouTube's non-human algorithms
  • ability to download (and then, with other software, modify and reuse) freely licensed videos, such as those licensed under CC-BY
  • various aids for journalists, including fact-checking, video analysis, and bandwidth saving

We realize Microsoft, a paying member of the RIAA, has left themselves stuck between their industry association's abuses of the law and the needs of FOSS projects for which they provide infrastructure. While under current law (which we object to), complying with the takedown notice is admittedly the fastest way to limit Microsoft's liability, we view Microsoft's membership in the RIAA as a much bigger liability to our community, now that Microsoft controls GitHub. We call on Microsoft to resign from the RIAA and remove their conflict of interest in this matter. This is an important opportunity for Microsoft to stand up for the values of software freedom.

If you work at Microsoft (including for its GitHub subsidiary), we call on you to petition your employer to resign immediately from the RIAA. We suggest that you raise these concerns directly with your manager or other management, or (even better) by starting an internal email petition with other employees.

To build a strong community of FOSS developers, we need confidence that our software hosting platforms will fight for our rights. While we'd prefer that Microsoft would simply refuse to kowtow to institutions like the RIAA and reject their DMCA requests, we believe in the alternative Microsoft can take the easy first step of resigning from RIAA in protest. We similarly call on all RIAA members who value FOSS to also resign.

Tags: FOSS Sustainability, software freedom for everyone

Public Support Makes All the Difference for GPL Compliance

by Denver Gingerich on January 9, 2020

In starting the new year, I am reminded of what we accomplished last year, but also of what we urgently need to get done this year. What I do at Conservancy is relatively unique, not just within Conservancy, but within software freedom non-profits as a whole. My primary focus is ensuring that organizations comply with the GPL so that people like you can continue to enjoy the freedom that the GPL and other copyleft licenses guarantee. Although it's a small part of what we do at Conservancy percentage-wise (partly due to funding constraints), GPL compliance and enforcement is crucial to the future of software freedom.

Your donations so far have allowed us to check numerous companies' source releases this year, each time getting us a bit closer to the goal of fully compliant releases of the GPLed software they use. While this is certainly important, it is frankly the bare minimum that we need to do in order to prevent the GPL from being treated as a permissive license that companies simply use to proprietarize all the code they use. We don't want to see your freedom taken away, and we need to keeping fighting to avoid that future.

We are at a turning point for software freedom. As our lives rely more and more on software embedded in the ever-expanding set of devices we use, it is more and more critical that we control the software they run. Companies need to see that not only is it straight-forward to comply with copyleft licenses, but that copyleft compliance is in fact a feature that their customers are specifically looking for (most companies do not comply with the GPL - we need both carrots and sticks to fix this). We have a project underway that we hope will solidify this in companies' minds, and with continued funding we plan to build and release substantial parts of it this year.

Persistent GPL enforcement has begun to change the software and hardware industry norms in our favour. However, we are at risk of losing all we have accomplished so far unless we are able to both continue our work in the fields that we are familiar with, but also, and even more importantly, to recognize and respond to new threats to our freedom as our digital world changes, demanding new software freedom licensing strategies and enforcement methods.

We often call on the community to help us with compliance work, but it is no exaggeration when I tell you that our ability to ensure your software freedom is a direct result of donations from individuals. The deadline for having your contributions to Conservancy doubled is next week and we have a ways to go to make our match challenge, so if you'd like to increase your donation or get your friends to support us, don't delay! You can find the full match details and donation info here.

Tags: GPL, FOSS Sustainability

Calling all Tesla owners: let's discuss the source code for the GPLed parts of your car!

by Denver Gingerich on October 30, 2019

It has been many years since we started working with Tesla to help them resolve their ongoing GPL violations. However, Tesla has still not provided the necessary source code for their cars (a benefit of ownership enshrined in the GPL, which Tesla chooses to use) and the incomplete versions of source they have released are more than 17 months old (at the time of this writing), despite new firmware being continuously delivered to Tesla vehicles. There have even been several updates within the past month. We know Tesla owners that care about software freedom are frustrated that they cannot exercise theirs.

We are looking for new ways to approach this issue. In particular, we are hoping to engage with interested Tesla owners to determine how we can work together and collectively improve the situation.

If you own a Tesla Model S, Model X, or Model 3, or know someone who does (especially in Canada, where I live) and would be interested in joining a discussion with Conservancy and other Tesla owners about this issue, please email us indicating your interest in the Tesla discussion. We'll get back to you in a day or two with details on how to join the conversation.

Please spread the word. Help us continue our work to bring meaningful software freedom to new classes of hardware, one manufacturer at a time.

Tags: GPL

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