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January 2, 2011 by Bradley M. Kuhn

Conservancy Activity Summary, October-December 2010

I had hoped to blog more regularly about my work at Conservancy, and hopefully I'll do better in the coming year. But now seems a good time to summarize what has happened with Conservancy since I started my full-time volunteer stint as Executive Director from 2010-10-01 until 2010-12-31.

New Members

We excitedly announced in the last few months two new Conservancy member projects, PyPy and Git. Thinking of PyPy connects me back to my roots in Computer Science: in graduate school, I focused on research about programming language infrastructure and, in particular, virtual machines and language runtimes. PyPy is a project that connects Conservancy to lots of exciting programming language research work of that nature, and I'm glad they've joined.

For its part, Git rounds out a group of three DVCS projects that are now Conservancy members; Conservancy is now the home of Darcs, Git, and Mercurial. Amusingly, when I reminded the Git developers when they applied that their “competition” were members, the Git developers told me that they were inspired to apply because these other DVCS' had been happy in Conservancy. That's a reminder that the software freedom community remains a place where projects — even that might seem on the surface as competitors — seek to get along and work together whenever possible. I'm glad Conservancy now hosts all these projects together.

Meanwhile, I remain in active discussions with five projects that have been offered membership in Conservancy. As I always tell new projects, joining Conservancy is a big step for a project, so it often takes time for communities to discuss the details of Conservancy's Fiscal Sponsorship Agreement. It may be some time before these five projects join, and perhaps they'll ultimately decide not to join. However, I'll continue to help them make the right decision for their project, even if joining a different fiscal sponsor (or not joining one at all) is the ultimately right choice.

Also, about once every two weeks, another inquiry about joining Conservancy comes in. We won't be able to accept all the projects that are interested, but hopefully many can become members of Conservancy.

Annual Filings

In the late fall, I finished up Conservancy's 2010 filings. Annual filings for a non-profit can be an administrative rat-hole at times, but the level of transparency they create for an organization makes them worth it. Conservancy's FY 2009 Federal Form 990 and FY 2009 New York CHAR-500 are up on Conservancy's filing page. I always make the filings available on our own website; I wish other non-profits would do this. It's so annoying to have to go to a third-party source to grab these documents. (Although New York State, to its credit, makes all the NY NPO filings available on its website.)

Conservancy filed a Form 990-EZ in FY 2009. If you take a look, I'd encourage you to direct the most attention to Part III (which is on the top of page 2) to see most of Conservancy's program activities between 2008-03-01 to 2009-02-28.

In FY 2010, Conservancy will move from the New York State requirement of “limited financial review” to “full audit“ (see page 4 of the CHAR-500 for the level requirements). Conservancy had so little funds in FY 2007 that it wasn't required to file a Form 990 at all. Now, just three years later, there is enough revenue to warrant a full audit. However, I've already begun preparing myself for all the administrative work that will entail.

Project Growth and Funding

Those increases in revenue are related to growth in many of Conservancy's projects. 2010 marked the beginning of the first full-time funding of a developer by Conservancy. Specifically, since June, Matt Mackall has been funded through directed donations to Conservancy to work full-time on Mercurial. Matt blogs once a month (under topic of Mercurial Fellowship Update) about his work, but, more directly, the hundreds of changesets that Matt's committed really show the advantages of funding projects through Conservancy.

Conservancy is also collecting donations and managing funding for various part-time development initiatives by many developers. Developers of jQuery, Sugar Labs, and Twisted have all recently received regular development funding through Conservancy. An important part of my job is making sure these developers receive funding and report the work clearly and fully to the community of donors (and the general public) that fund this work.

But, as usual with Conservancy, it's handling of the “many little things” for projects that make a big difference and sometimes takes the most time. In late 2010, Conservancy handled funding for Code Sprints and conferences for the Mercurial, Darcs, and jQuery. In addition, jQuery held a conference in Boston in October, for which Conservancy handled all the financial details. I was fortunate to be able to attend the conference and meet many of the jQuery developers in person for the first time. Wine also held their annual conference in November 2010, and Conservancy handled the venue details and reimbursements to many of travelers to the conference.

Also, as always, Conservancy project contributors regularly attend other conferences related to their projects. At least a few times a month, Conservancy reimburses developers for travel to speak and attend important conferences related to their projects.

Google Summer of Code

Since its inception, Google's Summer of Code (SoC) program has been one of the most important philanthropy programs for Open Source and Free Software projects. In 2010, eight Conservancy projects (and 5% of the entire SoC program) participated in SoC. The SoC program funds college students for the summer to contribute to the projects, and an experienced contributor to project mentors each student. A $500 stipend is paid to the non-profit organization of the project for each project contributor who mentors a student.

Furthermore, there's an annual conference, in October, of all the mentors, with travel funded by Google. This is a really valuable conference, since it's one of the few places where very disparate Free Software projects that usually wouldn't interact can meet up in one place. I attended this year's Soc Mentor Summit and hope to attend again next year.

I'm really going to be urging all Conservancy's projects to take advantage of the SoC program in 2011. The level of funding given out by Google for this program is higher than any other open-application funding program for FLOSS. While Google's selfish motives are clear (the program presumably helps them recruit young programmers to hire), the benefit to Free Software community of the program can nevertheless not be ignored.

GPL Enforcement

GPL Enforcement, primarily for our BusyBox member project, remains an active focus of Conservancy. Work regarding the lawsuit continues. It's been more than a year since Conservancy filed a lawsuit against fourteen defendants who manufacture embedded devices that included BusyBox without source nor an offer for source. Some of those have come into compliance with the GPL and settled, but a number remain and are out of compliance; our litigation efforts continue. Usually, our lawyers encourage us not to comment on ongoing litigation, but we did put up a news item in August when the Court granted Conservancy a default judgment against one of the defendants, Westinghouse.

Meanwhile, in the coming year, Conservancy hopes to expand efforts to enforce the GPL. New violation reports on BusyBox arrive almost daily that need attention.

More Frequent Blogging

As noted at the start of this post, my hope is to update Conservancy's blog more regularly with information about our activities.

Posted by Bradley M. Kuhn on January 2, 2011

Tags: conservancy, pypy, jQuery, Wine, Filings

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